1849 L. Downing Concord Stagecoach

Built by the L-Downing Company of Concord, New Hampshire and used at Atlantic House in Scarborough, Maine, this coach, with two bench seats and a jump seat inside, represents the finest coaches of the mid-1800s.

1850 ca. Portland Cutter

This Portland Cutter by an unknown builder is a typical example of the type. A characteristic of the Portland style is the sharp angle at the bottom of the back of the body, followed by an elegant curve up to the top.

1850 ca. Pray racing sulky

In mid-18th century England, the name sulky was applied to any single passenger vehicle. Hitched to a fine steed, the high wheel racy sulkies were an extremely light and speedy mode of transportation.

1890 ca. Straight Sill Rockaway

The Rockaway, originating around 1830 on Long Island, New York, was peculiarly American with its design meant to keep the coachman under cover.

1898 ca. Bronson wagon

J.B. Brewster patented the suspension system used on this carriage in 1873. It employs a spring over each axle with resilient wooden bars running front-to-back connecting them.

1899 Brewster side bar runabout

J.B. Brewster patented the suspension system used on this carriage in 1873. It employs a spring over each axle with durable wooden bars running fore and aft between them.

Dunton Reading Gypsy Caravan

Circus troops were among the first people to use wagons for homes in the early 1800s. As they traveled from town to town, venue to venue, these large wagons were pulled by teams of horses.